BE QUIET & DRIVE


Leave a comment

British Bernie announces the Poundland Grand Prix!

I wasn’t planning on blogging today, but as I sat here, watching Martin Brundle interview Bernie Ecclestone, I felt I needed to say something, anything, about the future of Formula One in Europe.

Let’s take a trip in our Delorian, back to a time before KERS, F-Ducts, sponsorship and safety belts, to the Racing world of the 1920’s and 30’s. Prior to the existence of Formula One, the European Grand Prix motor racing scene reined supreme with the best drivers of continental Europe fighting it out around hay baled circuits in shirtsleeves and scarfes. Formula One kicked off in 1947, with the emergence of the FIA, and so the World Championship was born in 1950.

So what’s gone wrong? Does Formula One no longer care about Europe? Of course not! The problem is the lining of Mr Ecclestone’s pocket.

Bernie contemplates the number of zero’s culminating at the end of his bank account balance…

It has been said, that the only language Bernie Ecclestone truly understands is that of money. Since he rose to control Formula One’s business interests there have been several questionable moves, which have no reasonable bearing to the continued enjoyment of your average armchair-driving fan. Back in 1997, the rights to broadcasting race weekends in the UK were sold to ITV, a lucrative deal financially speaking, which left fans dismayed to say the least as they struggled to watch races interrupted by commercial breaks. They shipped Murray Walker across to the ITV commentary box, but it took more than a familiar voice to convince us it was worth the pay cheque.

There have been the regular problems with the holding of the British Grand Prix, in particular in 2004 when Bernie suggested the race be dropped all together! Cue the ensuing battle between Silverstone and Donington Park to become the race’s home. In the aftermath of this, Donington’s money ran out and to this day, the infield looks more like a quarry, while Silverstone has upped it’s game, but still struggled to gain Bernie’s favour as the rain came down in July 2012.

There have been disputes over tyres, sponsorship rows and lest we forget the ongoing problem with Bahrain.. Bernie seems to be intent on taking the Formula One world to more out-reaching parts of the planet, parts where the locals have to be cajoled into attending races, while Silverstone sells out in the space of a couple of months. Why would it be profitable to take the sport away from the people who love it? As a resident of the UK, I have had the opportunity to visit two Grands Prix; Monaco in 2011 as part of a family holiday, and Silverstone in 2012 (yes I got wet, no I didn’t mind a bit) it took me the better part of fifteen years to get to my first race and I’m planning a trip to Belgium in 2014. What if Spa disappeared before I got there? We’ve already lost Magny Cours, and Paul Ricard doesn’t get a look in despite it’s constant reminders that it’s capable of holding an event.

In the interview on Sky Sports F1 this morning  Bernie said that the confirmed 2013 line up of seven European races could drop to as low as four. I can count Hungary as one of the victims of this cull, as the Eastern European circuit has suffered from poor attendances, and struggled to keep the track in condition. Who else could go? Valencia only really stood in as a replacement for the European Grand Prix at the Nurbergring, and that’s gone anyway, with Monaco and Singapore we didn’t really need another street circuit.

We’ll keep trying to move forward. We’re a world championship.

The question for me is would he chop the British Grand Prix? Would he be that callous, to the people who share his nationality? Westernised as we are in this country, we can’t all hop down to Heathrow and head out to the long haul races. Flicking through the pages of F1 Racing Magazine, you can see how cheap it is to purchase a weekend ticket for places like India, South Korea and Malaysia, but we can’t get there, we want our race, in Oxford so all we have to do is drive seventy miles down the M1 and pitch a damn tent!

So I suppose we’ll just have to wait and see. Bernie has proved in the past, that what’s best for Formula One always coincides with what’s best for Bernie. We’re set to have two races in America, when the New Jersey Grand Prix finally confirms its place on the calendar, two races in a country in which the majority of sports fans love football, basketball and baseball. Yes, some of them like motorsport, Nascar has massive viewing figures, but those figures are arbitrary as far as Bernie is concerned because Nascar is favoured in the Southern States of America, areas which dwarf the whole of the UK, population terms – there is no percentage comparison.

I apologise to anyone who feels like they’re losing out by not having Formula One within their travelling range, but I have put too much time, effort, and emotion into this sport to see the only races I can realistically visit be taken away. Bernie doesn’t deserve to call himself British if he dares scratch our race from the calendar.

Advertisements